Iron Age Echoes

Prehistoric land management and the creation of a funerary landscape - the “twin barrows” at the Echoput in Apeldoorn

Edited by David Fontijn, Quentin Bourgeois & Arjan Louwen | 2012

Iron Age Echoes

Prehistoric land management and the creation of a funerary landscape - the “twin barrows” at the Echoput in Apeldoorn

Edited by David Fontijn, Quentin Bourgeois & Arjan Louwen | 2012

ISBN: 9789088900730

Imprint: Sidestone Press | Format: 210x297mm | 174 pp. | Excavation report, Leiden University, the Netherlands | Language: English | 26 illus. (bw) | 72 illus. (fc) | Category: prehistoric archaeology, barrow excavation, bronze age, iron age | download cover

Groups of burial mounds may be among the most tangible and visible remains of Europe’s prehistoric past. Yet, not much is known on how “barrow landscapes” came into being . This book deals with that topic, by presenting the results of archaeological research carried out on a group of just two barrows that crown a small hilltop near the Echoput (“echo-well”) in Apeldoorn, the Netherlands.

In 2007, archaeologists of the Ancestral Mounds project of Leiden University carried out an excavation of parts of these mounds and their immediate environment. They discovered that these mounds are rare examples of monumental barrows from the later part of the Iron Age. They were probably built at the same time, and their similarities are so conspicuous that one might speak of “twin barrows”.

The research team was able to reconstruct the long-term history of this hilltop. We can follow how the hilltop that is now deep in the forests of the natural reserve of the Kroondomein Het Loo, once was an open place in the landscape. With pragmatism not unlike our own, we see how our prehistoric predecessors carefully managed and maintained the open area for a long time, before it was transformed into a funerary site. The excavation yielded many details on how people built the barrows by cutting and arranging heather sods, and how the mounds were used for burial rituals in the Iron Age.

The book was officially presented to H.M. Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, read all about it in our news section



This publication is part of the Ancestral Mounds Research Project of the University of Leiden: overview of the other Ancestral Mounds-publications

Arjan Louwen MA

Arjan Louwen (1986) is currently a researcher at the Faculty of Archaeology, University of Leiden, the Netherlands. He graduated in 2010 on urnfield – settlement relations of the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age in the Eastern Netherlands.

read more

Dr. Quentin Bourgeois

Quentin performed his PhD study within the research project Ancestral Mounds.In his research he dealt with groups of barrows and their position within the landscape. Through extensive GIS-analyses he attempted to shed some light on the choice of location for the placement of the burial monuments. Why were they placed there, what could be seen from that location, and how did this develop through time?

read more

Dr. David Fontijn

Dr David Fontijn is associate professor in European Archaeology at the Faculty of Archaeology, University of Leiden, the Netherlands. His research focuses on the European Bronze Age and Early Iron Age, in particular on the exchange and deposition of metalwork, and on the archaeology of so-called “ritual” landscapes. He graduated and wrote his PhD. thesis at Leiden University, both marked cum laude.

read more

Abstract:

Groups of burial mounds may be among the most tangible and visible remains of Europe’s prehistoric past. Yet, not much is known on how “barrow landscapes” came into being . This book deals with that topic, by presenting the results of archaeological research carried out on a group of just two barrows that crown a small hilltop near the Echoput (“echo-well”) in Apeldoorn, the Netherlands.

In 2007, archaeologists of the Ancestral Mounds project of Leiden University carried out an excavation of parts of these mounds and their immediate environment. They discovered that these mounds are rare examples of monumental barrows from the later part of the Iron Age. They were probably built at the same time, and their similarities are so conspicuous that one might speak of “twin barrows”.

The research team was able to reconstruct the long-term history of this hilltop. We can follow how the hilltop that is now deep in the forests of the natural reserve of the Kroondomein Het Loo, once was an open place in the landscape. With pragmatism not unlike our own, we see how our prehistoric predecessors carefully managed and maintained the open area for a long time, before it was transformed into a funerary site. The excavation yielded many details on how people built the barrows by cutting and arranging heather sods, and how the mounds were used for burial rituals in the Iron Age.

The book was officially presented to H.M. Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, read all about it in our news section



This publication is part of the Ancestral Mounds Research Project of the University of Leiden: overview of the other Ancestral Mounds-publications

Arjan Louwen MA

Arjan Louwen (1986) is currently a researcher at the Faculty of Archaeology, University of Leiden, the Netherlands. He graduated in 2010 on urnfield – settlement relations of the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age in the Eastern Netherlands.

read more

Dr. Quentin Bourgeois

Quentin performed his PhD study within the research project Ancestral Mounds.In his research he dealt with groups of barrows and their position within the landscape. Through extensive GIS-analyses he attempted to shed some light on the choice of location for the placement of the burial monuments. Why were they placed there, what could be seen from that location, and how did this develop through time?

read more

Dr. David Fontijn

Dr David Fontijn is associate professor in European Archaeology at the Faculty of Archaeology, University of Leiden, the Netherlands. His research focuses on the European Bronze Age and Early Iron Age, in particular on the exchange and deposition of metalwork, and on the archaeology of so-called “ritual” landscapes. He graduated and wrote his PhD. thesis at Leiden University, both marked cum laude.

read more









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