Photo-Museology

The presence of absence and the absence of presence

Mark Adams and Nicholas Thomas | Forthcoming

Photo-Museology

The presence of absence and the absence of presence

Mark Adams and Nicholas Thomas | Forthcoming

ISBN: 9789088906329

Imprint: Sidestone Press | Format: 182x257mm | ca. 340 pp. | Pacific Presences 7 | Language: English | download cover

Publication date: 28-03-2019

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    ISBN: 9789088906329

    Imprint: Sidestone Press | Format: 182x257mm | ca. 340 pp. | Pacific Presences 7 | Language: English | download cover

    Publication date: 28-03-2019

Ethnographic museums, now often rebranded as collections of ‘world cultures’, appear permanently problematic, even as their contexts and the orientation of their activities change. Across Europe and elsewhere, curators and other museum staff are committed to dialogue and collaboration with the peoples from whom collections were made. But their vast assemblages of artefacts, removed from countries of origin primarily during the colonial period, and assumed, mostly inaccurately, to have been looted, seem always in question.

Photo-Museology arises from an art project undertaken over 25 years. From the early 1990s, Mark Adams and Nicholas Thomas together investigated sites of cross-cultural encounter in the Pacific and associated places in Europe, ranging from Captain Cook memorials to ethnographic museums. Some of those museums still exhibited colonial symbols and forms of knowledge, others had attempted to displace such histories, foregrounding more inclusive or progressive stories. Complementing the academic studies in the Pacific Presences series, this book offers what John Berger referred to as ‘another way of telling’. Through photography, it revisits the places collections were made, and the places they ended up in. It is a meditation on presence and absence.

This books is part of the Pacific Presences series. Click here to see the other volumes in this series.

Introduction

Part I: Oceania

1. Tahiti
2. Hawaiï
3. New Zealand
4. New Caledonia
5. Samoa
6. Norfolk Island
7. Vanuatu

Part II: Europe

1. Cambridge
2. London
3. Oxford
4. Lode
5. Whitby
6. Birchington-on-Sea
7. Hamburg
8. Gottingen
9. Tubingen
10. Stuttgart
11. Munich
12. Berlin
13. Zurich
14. Tallinn
15. Perpignan
16. Paris
17. Stockholm

Epilogue

note: Each ‘chapter’ is a set of images of varying number – some 2-3, a few up to 20; preceded by a single page, contextualising text; a short select bibliography will list relevant texts.

Mark Adams

Mark Adams is one of New Zealand’s most distinguished photographic artists. He was born in Christchurch, and attended Canterbury University School of Fine Arts from 1967 to 1970.

read more

Prof. dr. Nicholas Thomas

Nicholas Thomas did doctoral research in the Marquesas Islands and has since written extensively on exploration and cross-cultural encounters and on art histories in the Pacific. He has been Director of the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Cambridge since 2006.

read more

Abstract:

Ethnographic museums, now often rebranded as collections of ‘world cultures’, appear permanently problematic, even as their contexts and the orientation of their activities change. Across Europe and elsewhere, curators and other museum staff are committed to dialogue and collaboration with the peoples from whom collections were made. But their vast assemblages of artefacts, removed from countries of origin primarily during the colonial period, and assumed, mostly inaccurately, to have been looted, seem always in question.

Photo-Museology arises from an art project undertaken over 25 years. From the early 1990s, Mark Adams and Nicholas Thomas together investigated sites of cross-cultural encounter in the Pacific and associated places in Europe, ranging from Captain Cook memorials to ethnographic museums. Some of those museums still exhibited colonial symbols and forms of knowledge, others had attempted to displace such histories, foregrounding more inclusive or progressive stories. Complementing the academic studies in the Pacific Presences series, this book offers what John Berger referred to as ‘another way of telling’. Through photography, it revisits the places collections were made, and the places they ended up in. It is a meditation on presence and absence.

This books is part of the Pacific Presences series. Click here to see the other volumes in this series.

Contents

Introduction

Part I: Oceania

1. Tahiti
2. Hawaiï
3. New Zealand
4. New Caledonia
5. Samoa
6. Norfolk Island
7. Vanuatu

Part II: Europe

1. Cambridge
2. London
3. Oxford
4. Lode
5. Whitby
6. Birchington-on-Sea
7. Hamburg
8. Gottingen
9. Tubingen
10. Stuttgart
11. Munich
12. Berlin
13. Zurich
14. Tallinn
15. Perpignan
16. Paris
17. Stockholm

Epilogue

note: Each ‘chapter’ is a set of images of varying number – some 2-3, a few up to 20; preceded by a single page, contextualising text; a short select bibliography will list relevant texts.

Mark Adams

Mark Adams is one of New Zealand’s most distinguished photographic artists. He was born in Christchurch, and attended Canterbury University School of Fine Arts from 1967 to 1970.

read more

Prof. dr. Nicholas Thomas

Nicholas Thomas did doctoral research in the Marquesas Islands and has since written extensively on exploration and cross-cultural encounters and on art histories in the Pacific. He has been Director of the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Cambridge since 2006.

read more









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