Let a cow-skin be brought

Armour, Chariots and Other Leather Remains from Tutankhamun’s Tomb

André J. Veldmeijer & Salima Ikram | Forthcoming

Let a cow-skin be brought

Armour, Chariots and Other Leather Remains from Tutankhamun’s Tomb

André J. Veldmeijer & Salima Ikram | Forthcoming


Paperback ISBN: 9789464260984 | Hardback ISBN: 9789464260991 | Imprint: Sidestone Press | Format: 210x280mm | ca. 150 pp. | Language: English | >25 illus. (bw) | >100 illus. (fc) | Keywords: Tutankhamun; ancient Egypt; Howard Carter; pharaoh; chariot; weapon; leather; clothing; footwear; furniture; mummy; staff; leopard; cheetah; leatherworking | download cover

Publication date: 15-12-2022

We will plant a tree for each order containing a paperback or hardback book via OneTreePlanted.org.

One hundred years ago, Howard Carter, working for Lord Carnarvon, made one of the most important archaeological discoveries of all times in the Valley of the Kings (Luxor, Egypt): the nearly intact tomb of the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun (ca. 1335-1325 BC). In addition to the king’s body, the tomb contained well over 5000 objects, which were recovered, conserved and recorded by Carter and his team. The fabulous treasures, such as the gold coffins, funerary mask, jewellery, as well as the six near complete chariots are well known. The tomb, however, yielded a wide variety of objects, both sacred and secular, including some that are less elaborately decorated with precious materials but which are, from a scientific point of view, perhaps even more interesting (and enigmatic).

Many objects from the tomb still remain unstudied; those that have been published consist of specific groups, for example: thrones, chairs and stool; the bows; musical instruments; game boxes; the small gold shrine or the stone vessels. This work examines the tomb and its contents through an unusual lens: leather and other animal soft tissue products that were used in creating some of the tomb’s contents.

Through a study of these artefacts, the reader is guided through the surprising and complex world of leatherworking in ancient Egypt, focussing on the numerous different objects from the tomb that are either made entirely from or include leather, such as the chariots and their accoutrements, weapons, gloves, as well as hitherto unpublished finds, as among which leatherworking tools.

This approach offers new insights in ancient Egyptian technology as well as in the production and use of specific materials and objects. The findings are discussed in the wider framework of the development and organisation of the leather industry in New Kingdom Egypt.

1. Introduction

2. What is Leather and How to Make and Decorate it

3. Working with Leather

4. How to Research Leather

5. Importance of Leather in Ancient Egypt

6. Leather from the Tomb: Why Didn’t It Preserve (or Did It)?

7. The Objects: Expected and Unexpected Leather Finds
Chariots
Footwear
Sticks and staves
Clothing
Armour
Weapons
Boxes
Furniture
Body

8. Tools for Craftsmen

9. Discussion

Salima Ikram

Salima Ikram is Distinguished University Professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo, and has excavated extensively in Egypt as well as in Turkey. She has directed the Animal Mummy Project, the Amenmesse Project (KV10/KV63), the North Kharga Oasis Darb Ain Amur Project, and headed the archaeozoology team at Kinet Hoyuk in Turkey.

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Dr. André J. Veldmeijer

André J. Veldmeijer (Visiting Research Scholar American University in Cairo) studied archaeology at Leiden University and received his PhD in Vertebrate Palaeontology from Utrecht University in 2006. He has worked in Egypt since 1995 as a leather, footwear and cordage specialist in various research projects.

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Abstract:

One hundred years ago, Howard Carter, working for Lord Carnarvon, made one of the most important archaeological discoveries of all times in the Valley of the Kings (Luxor, Egypt): the nearly intact tomb of the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun (ca. 1335-1325 BC). In addition to the king’s body, the tomb contained well over 5000 objects, which were recovered, conserved and recorded by Carter and his team. The fabulous treasures, such as the gold coffins, funerary mask, jewellery, as well as the six near complete chariots are well known. The tomb, however, yielded a wide variety of objects, both sacred and secular, including some that are less elaborately decorated with precious materials but which are, from a scientific point of view, perhaps even more interesting (and enigmatic).

Many objects from the tomb still remain unstudied; those that have been published consist of specific groups, for example: thrones, chairs and stool; the bows; musical instruments; game boxes; the small gold shrine or the stone vessels. This work examines the tomb and its contents through an unusual lens: leather and other animal soft tissue products that were used in creating some of the tomb’s contents.

Through a study of these artefacts, the reader is guided through the surprising and complex world of leatherworking in ancient Egypt, focussing on the numerous different objects from the tomb that are either made entirely from or include leather, such as the chariots and their accoutrements, weapons, gloves, as well as hitherto unpublished finds, as among which leatherworking tools.

This approach offers new insights in ancient Egyptian technology as well as in the production and use of specific materials and objects. The findings are discussed in the wider framework of the development and organisation of the leather industry in New Kingdom Egypt.

Contents

1. Introduction

2. What is Leather and How to Make and Decorate it

3. Working with Leather

4. How to Research Leather

5. Importance of Leather in Ancient Egypt

6. Leather from the Tomb: Why Didn’t It Preserve (or Did It)?

7. The Objects: Expected and Unexpected Leather Finds
Chariots
Footwear
Sticks and staves
Clothing
Armour
Weapons
Boxes
Furniture
Body

8. Tools for Craftsmen

9. Discussion

Salima Ikram

Salima Ikram is Distinguished University Professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo, and has excavated extensively in Egypt as well as in Turkey. She has directed the Animal Mummy Project, the Amenmesse Project (KV10/KV63), the North Kharga Oasis Darb Ain Amur Project, and headed the archaeozoology team at Kinet Hoyuk in Turkey.

read more










We will plant a tree for each order containing a paperback or hardback book via OneTreePlanted.org.

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