Ceci n'est pas une hache

Neolithic Depositions in the Northern Netherlands

Karsten Wentink | 2006

Ceci n'est pas une hache

Neolithic Depositions in the Northern Netherlands

Karsten Wentink | 2006


Paperback ISBN: 9789088900013 | Hardback ISBN: 00000 | Imprint: Sidestone Press | Format: 210x280mm | 134 pp. | Mphil thesis, Leiden University | Language: English | 25 illus. (bw) | 5 illus. (fc) | Keywords: archaeology, prehistory, neolithic, depositions, ritual, sacrifice, flint axes, usewear analysis | download cover

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As early as the 19th century discoveries of groups of large axes puzzled those confronted with them. The fact that most were found in waterlogged places in particular formed the basis of speculation as to the nature of these objects. In this Research Master thesis, the character and significance of TRB flint axe depositions are explored. The first part of this thesis is mainly concerned with the question how selective deposition was structured. By means of metrical, spatial and functional analysis, patterns are explored that can shed light on the actions performed by people in the past.

The second part of this thesis deals with the meaning and significance of TRB flint axe depositions. Why did people in the past do the things they did, how were these actions meaningful and important? Using sociological theory and ethnographic evidence an interpretation is presented based on the empirically observed patterns.

Dr. Karsten Wentink

Karsten Wentink started his studies in 2001 at the Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University. He did a combined bachelors in both archaeological sciences (focus on functional analysis at the Laboratory for Artefact studies) and prehistoric archaeology (with a focus on the Neolithic of North-West Europe). He finished his Masters thesis in 2006 on Neolithic flint axe depositions. He started his PhD research in 2008 focussing on the role of grave sets in Corded Ware and Bell Beaker funerary practices.

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Abstract:

As early as the 19th century discoveries of groups of large axes puzzled those confronted with them. The fact that most were found in waterlogged places in particular formed the basis of speculation as to the nature of these objects. In this Research Master thesis, the character and significance of TRB flint axe depositions are explored. The first part of this thesis is mainly concerned with the question how selective deposition was structured. By means of metrical, spatial and functional analysis, patterns are explored that can shed light on the actions performed by people in the past.

The second part of this thesis deals with the meaning and significance of TRB flint axe depositions. Why did people in the past do the things they did, how were these actions meaningful and important? Using sociological theory and ethnographic evidence an interpretation is presented based on the empirically observed patterns.

Dr. Karsten Wentink

Karsten Wentink started his studies in 2001 at the Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University. He did a combined bachelors in both archaeological sciences (focus on functional analysis at the Laboratory for Artefact studies) and prehistoric archaeology (with a focus on the Neolithic of North-West Europe). He finished his Masters thesis in 2006 on Neolithic flint axe depositions. He started his PhD research in 2008 focussing on the role of grave sets in Corded Ware and Bell Beaker funerary practices.

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