Mediterranean Connections

How the sea links people and transforms identities

Edited by Laura C. Schmidt, Anja Rutter, Lutz Käppel & Oliver Nakoinz | 2023

Mediterranean Connections

How the sea links people and transforms identities

Edited by Laura C. Schmidt, Anja Rutter, Lutz Käppel & Oliver Nakoinz | 2023


Paperback ISBN: 9789464270693 | Hardback ISBN: 9789464270709 | Imprint: Sidestone Press Academics | Format: 210x280mm | 236 pp. | Scales of Transformation 18 | Series: Scales of Transformation | Language: English | 21 illus. (bw) | 20 illus. (fc) | Keywords: Mediterranean; transformation; connectivity; networks; seafaring; Classics; archaeology | download cover | DOI: 10.59641/i8m573bk

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The present publication constitutes the Proceedings of Session 7 of the ‘Creation of landscapes VI’ workshop, hosted by the CAU Kiel in 2019. The session was entitled ‘Mediterranean Connections – how the sea links people and transforms identities’.

With our focus on the linkage of people, this volume can be understood as a contribution to recent network research. But network research, especially when employed in the humanities, is often looked at with scepticism, not to say mistrust: Isn’t this just a game with numbers? Does it really relate to the type of data we are used to in our research, to poems, sherds or seal impressions? Can it say anything at all about… life?

In fact, the various articles of this volume are not restricted to the strict technical approach of classical network research. Our session on Mediterranean networks started from the idea that for the inhabitants of this relatively integrated region, the sea evidently influenced their lives and their thinking in a significant way. In fact, it was the sea that provided the medium for such integration on various levels. The substantial body of data produced by long-standing research in diverse disciplines makes it possible to chart the emergence of ancient perceptions of distance and movement, connectivity and identities. This approach allows us to observe ancient awareness of the role of the sea in these processes. It also allows us to connect across academic boundaries and build a network of disciplines for a much more cohesive picture of past life.

Foreword

Introduction
Anja Rutter, Laura C. Schmidt

Part 1: Identity of Centres and Peripheries

Seafaring and the Reception of (Some) Archaic Greek Lyric Poetry
Maria Noussia-Fantuzzi

Chalcidic connectivity between Sithonia and Pallene: transmutations of epichoric identity and resilience in the long 5th and 4th c. B.C.
Maria G. Xanthou

The importance of geography to the networked Late Bronze Age Aegean
Paula Gheorghiade, Henry Price, Ray Rivers

To be Greek or not to be: about the “Greekness” of Epirus and Southern Illyria. An overview through urbanism and theatrical architecture in a Mediterranean perspective
Ludovica Xavier de Silva

Frozen Wine and the frozen Black Sea. Ovid as Exiled Poet Faced with Climatic Extremes (trist. 3.10; Pont. 4.7; 4.9; 4.10)
Stefan Feddern

A Sea of Wine and Honey: networks of narratives as resources for the negotiation of identities, an heuristic approach in the Hellenistic Western Mediterranean
Raffaella Da Vela

Part 2: Connectivity by Sea and Networking of Seafarers

Seafaring Songs in Pindar’s Epinikia and Enkomia
Thomas Kuhn-Treichel

Maritime Cultural Landscapes of Fishing Communities in Roman Cyprus
Maria M. Michael, Carmen Obied

Sea Storms and Aristocratic Identity in Alcaeus
Ippokratis Kantzios

The Ideology of Seafaring in the Odyssey and Telemachos’ Hanging of the Slave Girls (Od. 22,461-474)
Hauke Schneider

Malta’s connections and cultural identity: remarks on the architectural language in the western Mediterranean in the 4th and 3rd centuries BCE
Francesca Bonzano

Becoming a Man Ashore – the Role of the Sea in Sappho’s Brothers Song
Laura C. Schmidt

Dr. Laura C. Schmidt

Laura Schmidt has studied Classics at the Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel and the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. She defended her PhD thesis under the title “From Lesbos to Athens: Sappho’s Place in the Symposium and Greek Learning” in 2020. She has been member of the Graduate School ‘Human Development in Landscapes’ (2016-2020). She worked on Plato’s concept of optics at the CRC 1266 “Scales of Transformation” at Kiel (2020) and participated in the interdisciplinary project “Gardens, Human Senses and Eudaimonia” of the Cluster of Excellence ROOTS at Kiel (2021). She is currently researching the “thin Anthropocene” in classical antiquity as a member of the ROOTS Cluster of Excellence.

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Prof. dr. Lutz Käppel

Studies of Classics in Tübingen and Oxford, PhD 1990, Habilitation 1997, Professor of Classics, especially Greek Literature at the Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel 1999-, Ordinary Member of the German Archaeological Institute 2000-, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities 2006-2008, Co-Coordinator of the Kiel Graduate School ‘Human Development in Landscapes’ 2007-2016; Speaker of the University’s Research Focus ‘Social, Environmental, Cultural Change’ 2007–.

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Anja Rutter MA

Holding an MA in medieval history (Universität Bielefeld) and another in maritime archaeology (University of Southampton), Anja Rutter has been an interdisciplinary researcher from the outset. After gaining experience as a research diver and a field archaeologist, she is now writing her PhD on Bronze Age networks in the Levant at the Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel. Her main research focusses on networked identities, mental maps and the question of continuitiy in societies during and after upheaval and forced change.
As Anja Rutter also has long-time experience in museum didactics and citizen science, she has a special interest in making research accessible and understandable to the public and in the role the humanities can play in shaping our ideas of the future.

read more

Prof. Dr. Oliver Nakoinz

Oliver Nakoinz is a lecturer at Kiel University. He obtained his PhD in 2004 with “Studien zur räumlichen Abgrenzung und Strukturierung der älteren Hunsrück-Eifel-Kultur” and his habilitation in 2010 with “Archäologische Kulturgeographie der ältereisenzeitlichen Zentralorte Südwestdeutschlands”. His work is focused on quantitative archaeology, landscape archaeology and interaction and connectivity, in particular in the Iron Age. Furthermore, he is dedicated to the idea of interdisciplinary integration and integrating theory and method.

read more

Abstract:

The present publication constitutes the Proceedings of Session 7 of the ‘Creation of landscapes VI’ workshop, hosted by the CAU Kiel in 2019. The session was entitled ‘Mediterranean Connections – how the sea links people and transforms identities’.

With our focus on the linkage of people, this volume can be understood as a contribution to recent network research. But network research, especially when employed in the humanities, is often looked at with scepticism, not to say mistrust: Isn’t this just a game with numbers? Does it really relate to the type of data we are used to in our research, to poems, sherds or seal impressions? Can it say anything at all about… life?

In fact, the various articles of this volume are not restricted to the strict technical approach of classical network research. Our session on Mediterranean networks started from the idea that for the inhabitants of this relatively integrated region, the sea evidently influenced their lives and their thinking in a significant way. In fact, it was the sea that provided the medium for such integration on various levels. The substantial body of data produced by long-standing research in diverse disciplines makes it possible to chart the emergence of ancient perceptions of distance and movement, connectivity and identities. This approach allows us to observe ancient awareness of the role of the sea in these processes. It also allows us to connect across academic boundaries and build a network of disciplines for a much more cohesive picture of past life.

Contents

Foreword

Introduction
Anja Rutter, Laura C. Schmidt

Part 1: Identity of Centres and Peripheries

Seafaring and the Reception of (Some) Archaic Greek Lyric Poetry
Maria Noussia-Fantuzzi

Chalcidic connectivity between Sithonia and Pallene: transmutations of epichoric identity and resilience in the long 5th and 4th c. B.C.
Maria G. Xanthou

The importance of geography to the networked Late Bronze Age Aegean
Paula Gheorghiade, Henry Price, Ray Rivers

To be Greek or not to be: about the “Greekness” of Epirus and Southern Illyria. An overview through urbanism and theatrical architecture in a Mediterranean perspective
Ludovica Xavier de Silva

Frozen Wine and the frozen Black Sea. Ovid as Exiled Poet Faced with Climatic Extremes (trist. 3.10; Pont. 4.7; 4.9; 4.10)
Stefan Feddern

A Sea of Wine and Honey: networks of narratives as resources for the negotiation of identities, an heuristic approach in the Hellenistic Western Mediterranean
Raffaella Da Vela

Part 2: Connectivity by Sea and Networking of Seafarers

Seafaring Songs in Pindar’s Epinikia and Enkomia
Thomas Kuhn-Treichel

Maritime Cultural Landscapes of Fishing Communities in Roman Cyprus
Maria M. Michael, Carmen Obied

Sea Storms and Aristocratic Identity in Alcaeus
Ippokratis Kantzios

The Ideology of Seafaring in the Odyssey and Telemachos’ Hanging of the Slave Girls (Od. 22,461-474)
Hauke Schneider

Malta’s connections and cultural identity: remarks on the architectural language in the western Mediterranean in the 4th and 3rd centuries BCE
Francesca Bonzano

Becoming a Man Ashore – the Role of the Sea in Sappho’s Brothers Song
Laura C. Schmidt

Dr. Laura C. Schmidt

Laura Schmidt has studied Classics at the Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel and the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. She defended her PhD thesis under the title “From Lesbos to Athens: Sappho’s Place in the Symposium and Greek Learning” in 2020. She has been member of the Graduate School ‘Human Development in Landscapes’ (2016-2020). She worked on Plato’s concept of optics at the CRC 1266 “Scales of Transformation” at Kiel (2020) and participated in the interdisciplinary project “Gardens, Human Senses and Eudaimonia” of the Cluster of Excellence ROOTS at Kiel (2021). She is currently researching the “thin Anthropocene” in classical antiquity as a member of the ROOTS Cluster of Excellence.

read more

Prof. dr. Lutz Käppel

Studies of Classics in Tübingen and Oxford, PhD 1990, Habilitation 1997, Professor of Classics, especially Greek Literature at the Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel 1999-, Ordinary Member of the German Archaeological Institute 2000-, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities 2006-2008, Co-Coordinator of the Kiel Graduate School ‘Human Development in Landscapes’ 2007-2016; Speaker of the University’s Research Focus ‘Social, Environmental, Cultural Change’ 2007–.

read more

Anja Rutter MA

Holding an MA in medieval history (Universität Bielefeld) and another in maritime archaeology (University of Southampton), Anja Rutter has been an interdisciplinary researcher from the outset. After gaining experience as a research diver and a field archaeologist, she is now writing her PhD on Bronze Age networks in the Levant at the Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel. Her main research focusses on networked identities, mental maps and the question of continuitiy in societies during and after upheaval and forced change.
As Anja Rutter also has long-time experience in museum didactics and citizen science, she has a special interest in making research accessible and understandable to the public and in the role the humanities can play in shaping our ideas of the future.

read more

Prof. Dr. Oliver Nakoinz

Oliver Nakoinz is a lecturer at Kiel University. He obtained his PhD in 2004 with “Studien zur räumlichen Abgrenzung und Strukturierung der älteren Hunsrück-Eifel-Kultur” and his habilitation in 2010 with “Archäologische Kulturgeographie der ältereisenzeitlichen Zentralorte Südwestdeutschlands”. His work is focused on quantitative archaeology, landscape archaeology and interaction and connectivity, in particular in the Iron Age. Furthermore, he is dedicated to the idea of interdisciplinary integration and integrating theory and method.

read more










We will plant a tree for each order containing a paperback or hardback book via OneTreePlanted.org.

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