STPAS: Scales of Transformation in Prehistoric and Archaic Societies

The book series ‘Scales of Transformation in Prehistoric and Archaic Societies’ (STPAS) is an international scientific series that covers major results deriving from or being associated with the research conducted in the Collaborative Research Centre ‘Scales of Transformation: Human-Environmental Interaction in Prehistoric and Archaic Societies’ (CRC 1266). Primarily located at Kiel University, Germany, the CRC 1266 is a large interdisciplinary project investigating multiple aspects of socio-environmental transformations in ancient societies between 15,000 and 1 BCE across Europe.

The new book series is dedicated to the fundamental research questions of the CRC 1266 dealing with transformations on different temporal, spatial and social scales, here defined as processes leading to a substantial and enduring reorganization of socio-environmental interaction patterns. What are the substantial transformations that describe human development from 15,000 years ago to the beginning of the Common Era? How did the interaction between natural environment and human populations change over time? What role did humans play as cognitive actors trying to deal with changing social and environmental conditions? Which factors triggered the transformations that led to substantial societal and economic inequality?

The understanding of human practices within the often intertwined social and environmental contexts is one of the most fundamental aspects of archaeological research. Moreover, in current debates, the dynamics and feedback involved in human-environmental relationships have become a major issue looking at the sometimes devastating consequences of human interference with nature. Archaeology, with its long-term perspective on human societies and landscapes, is in the unique position to trace and link comparable phenomena in the past, to study the human involvement with the natural environment, to investigate the impact of humans on nature, and the consequences of environmental change on human societies. Modern interlinked interdisciplinary research allows for reaching beyond simplistic monocausal lines of explanation and overcoming evolutionary perspectives. Looking at the period from 15,000 to 1 BCE, the CRC 1266 takes a diachronic view in order to investigate transformations involved in the development of late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers, horticulturalists, early agriculturalists, early metallurgists as well as early state societies, thus covering a wide array of societal formations and environmental conditions.

The volumes of the series include monographs with detailed basic data and comprehensive interpretations from different case studies and landscapes and the extensive output from numerous scientific meetings and international workshops that have undergone a peer-review process.

More detailed information about the CRC 1266: http://www.sfb1266.uni-kiel.de/en


Prof. Dr. Wiebke Kirleis
Prof. Dr. Johannes Müller
Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, SFB 1266 “TransformationsDimensionen”
Institute for Prehistoric and Protohistoric Archaeology
Johanna-Mestorf-Straße 2-6, 24118 Kiel Germany


Dr. Hermann Gorbahn, Research Coordinator
Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, SFB 1266 “TransformationsDimensionen”
Leibnizstraße 3, 24118 Kiel, Germany

E-mail:


STPAS: Scales of Transformation in Prehistoric and Archaic Societies

The book series ‘Scales of Transformation in Prehistoric and Archaic Societies’ (STPAS) is an international scientific series that covers major results deriving from or being associated with the research conducted in the Collaborative Research Centre ‘Scales of Transformation: Human-Environmental Interaction in Prehistoric and Archaic Societies’ (CRC 1266). Primarily located at Kiel University, Germany, the CRC 1266 is a large interdisciplinary project investigating multiple aspects of socio-environmental transformations in ancient societies between 15,000 and 1 BCE across Europe.

The new book series is dedicated to the fundamental research questions of the CRC 1266 dealing with transformations on different temporal, spatial and social scales, here defined as processes leading to a substantial and enduring reorganization of socio-environmental interaction patterns. What are the substantial transformations that describe human development from 15,000 years ago to the beginning of the Common Era? How did the interaction between natural environment and human populations change over time? What role did humans play as cognitive actors trying to deal with changing social and environmental conditions? Which factors triggered the transformations that led to substantial societal and economic inequality?

The understanding of human practices within the often intertwined social and environmental contexts is one of the most fundamental aspects of archaeological research. Moreover, in current debates, the dynamics and feedback involved in human-environmental relationships have become a major issue looking at the sometimes devastating consequences of human interference with nature. Archaeology, with its long-term perspective on human societies and landscapes, is in the unique position to trace and link comparable phenomena in the past, to study the human involvement with the natural environment, to investigate the impact of humans on nature, and the consequences of environmental change on human societies. Modern interlinked interdisciplinary research allows for reaching beyond simplistic monocausal lines of explanation and overcoming evolutionary perspectives. Looking at the period from 15,000 to 1 BCE, the CRC 1266 takes a diachronic view in order to investigate transformations involved in the development of late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers, horticulturalists, early agriculturalists, early metallurgists as well as early state societies, thus covering a wide array of societal formations and environmental conditions.

The volumes of the series include monographs with detailed basic data and comprehensive interpretations from different case studies and landscapes and the extensive output from numerous scientific meetings and international workshops that have undergone a peer-review process.

More detailed information about the CRC 1266: http://www.sfb1266.uni-kiel.de/en


Editors

Prof. Dr. Wiebke Kirleis
Prof. Dr. Johannes Müller
Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, SFB 1266 “TransformationsDimensionen”
Institute for Prehistoric and Protohistoric Archaeology
Johanna-Mestorf-Straße 2-6, 24118 Kiel Germany


Contact information

Dr. Hermann Gorbahn, Research Coordinator
Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, SFB 1266 “TransformationsDimensionen”
Leibnizstraße 3, 24118 Kiel, Germany

E-mail:


Scales of Transformation latest volumes

Habitus?

The Social Dimension of Technology and Transformation

Edited by Sławomir Kadrow & Johannes Müller | 2019

The problem of the social dimension of technology and transformation seen in the perspective of the habitus has been repeatedly undertaken in various works. However,...


Embracing Bell Beaker

Adopting new ideas and objects across Europe during the later 3rd millennium BC (c. 2600-2000 BC)

Jos Kleijne | 2019

This book deals with the question how communities across Europe during the later 3rd millennium BC adopt and transform the Bell Beaker phenomenon differently. By...


Das Jungneolithikum in Schleswig-Holstein

Sebastian Schultrich | 2018

Dieses Buch bietet eine umfassende Studie zum Jungneolithikum (JN, auch Einzelgrabkultur, ca. 2850 – 2250 v. Chr.) in Schleswig-Holstein. Neben einer detaillierten Darstellung aller Funde und Befunde dieser Epoche, liegt ein besonderer Fokus auf Analysen zu den charakteristischen Streitäxten.

Diese...


Detecting and explaining technological innovation in prehistory

Edited by Michela Spataro & Martin Furholt | Forthcoming

Technology refers to any set of standardised procedures for transforming raw materials into finished products. Innovation consists of any change in technology which has tangible and lasting effect on human practices, whether or not it provides utilitarian advantages. Prehistoric societies...


Maidanets'ke

Development and decline of a Trypillia mega-site in Central Ukraine

René Ohlrau | Forthcoming

At the end of the 5th millennium BCE, some of the vastest settlements of the time emerged on the forest steppe north of the...








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